DUKE CANNON’S FAVORITE IDIOMS – Duke Cannon

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Grandpa said them, dad said them, now you say them. We are referring of course to idioms; those non-literal expressions that cut across generational and cultural lines like a hot knife through butter. Whether at home or in the workplace, idioms suit almost every occasion. Since we pepper them into everyday conversation on a frequent basis, we naturally have our favorites that we rely on to carry forth our desired message. Here is a handy guide for you print out and carry in your wallet so that you may do likewise.

“I’VE GOT NEWS FOR YOU”
Commonly used as a precursor to something that someone needs to hear, with the irony that what is being communicated is not really news at all, but something that should be as plain as the nose on someone’s face. Can be used on friend or foe with equal effectiveness.

“WHAT IS THIS, GRAND CENTRAL STATION?”
This is best employed in crowded bathrooms (either at work or at a concert/sporting event), and will almost always get a laugh, or at the very least a snort and a nod from the other fellows waiting in line.

“HOLD YOUR HORSES”
This tells the other party to relax, that you are very much aware of the urgency involved, and that they are acting like someone who cannot control their livestock, which is one of the worst accusations you can level at another man.

“YOU’RE BARKING UP THE WRONG TREE”
A course-corrective phrase that lets the other party know that they are misguided in focusing their attention on you, and that they should direct their attention elsewhere. In short: leave us alone so that we may continue napping on our hammock or what have you.

“THIS WILL BE A PIECE OF CAKE”
This is Idiom 101. A task-oriented shorthand that communicates expected ease. After all, cake is delicious, and not at all difficult to consume.

“THE BALL IS IN THEIR COURT”
A classic sports metaphor (springing from the game of tennis) used to tell someone that you have done your part and pushed things as far as they can go; the other party is now holding things up. Combining this with the aforementioned “barking up the wrong tree” is a devastating one-two punch that will let people know that you are a force to be reckoned with in the idiom realm.

“IT’S CRUNCH TIME”
This does not refer to potato chip eating (although we suppose it easily could), but instead is a more classic version of “It’s Go Time.” See also: “The Chips Are Down.” (Again, not about potato chips, but also again, we suppose it could be).

“SH*T OR GET OFF THE POT”
This enduring chestnut works on two levels: 1) as an idiomatic demand for someone to hurry up and make a decision already, or get a move on in general, and 2) in a more literal sense, when urgently banging on a locked bathroom door (occupied by say, a teenager who has been in there all day) in order to hopefully gain swift entry.

Source link: https://dukecannon.com/blogs/journal/straight-from-the-horses-mouth-duke-cannons-favorite-idioms by Zeb Pirkey at dukecannon.com